Nov 16, 2013
06:44 AM
Arts & Entertainment

Hartford Event for Malcolm Gladwell, Big Thinker Who Wants Us to Less in Awe of Power Coming

Hartford Event for Malcolm Gladwell, Big Thinker Who Wants Us to Less in Awe of Power Coming

Malcolm Gladwell.

People may not always agree with Malcolm Gladwell, but he makes them think. The mere fact that his insightful observations about life have taken the world by storm might be a sign that there’s still hope for the human race. Next week, on Nov. 21, he joins the conversation at The Connecticut Forum with historian David Brinkley.

Gladwell, 50, was born in England. When he was 6, his Jamaican-born psychotherapist mother and British mathematics professor father moved the family to Ontario, Canada. At 20 he moved to Indiana to begin a career in journalism at The American Spectator, and then went to The Washington Post to cover business and science in 1987. He’s been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 1996, and in 2000 began cranking out the books that have made him famous. 

In his first book, The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference, he explained how trends were born; basically they spread like a virus. The book was a long-running best seller and was eventually named one of the best of the decade by Amazon.com customers. Five years later, when he published Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking, he became a pop-culture phenomenon and won a spot on Time’s annual list of the 100 most influential people. He proclaimed that it’s not the brightest who succeed in Outliers, and also blew us away with the “10,000-hour rule” (after doing something for 10,000 hours, a person becomes freakishly skillfull at it). 

“Each one of my books has become more personal,” he says. In his newest book (out just last month)—David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits and the Art of Battling Giants—Gladwell tackles culture and heroism. “In this book, I’d like people to think a little more deeply and be a little less in awe of power,” he says. 

He’s been accused of oversimplifying, but he’s so charming even his critics like him. “I steer clear of negativity,” he says. “I don’t demean or attack and people respond to it. I think you can challenge people’s core assumptions only so many times before you lose them. I want them to listen to what I have to say.”

For tickets or more information, call (860)509-0909 or see the Connecticut Forum website.

 

 

Hartford Event for Malcolm Gladwell, Big Thinker Who Wants Us to Less in Awe of Power Coming

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