Vampires in Connecticut, and Our Link to Hitler's Skull, in Talks by State Archeologist

02/26/14

Vampires in Connecticut, and Our Link to Hitler's Skull, in Talks by State Archeologist

State archeologist Dr. Nicholas Bellantoni will talk about Connecticut's vampires in Madison, and his investigation into Hitler's remains in a Washington event.

Posted at 08:55 AM | Permalink | Comments

New Haven Pizza History Revelation: Pepe's Came After Camposano Apizza

02/23/14

New Haven Pizza History Revelation: Pepe's Came After Camposano Apizza

This revelation arose when Colin Caplan, who has written many books about New Haven history, spoke last December at the New Haven Museum. He was promoting his latest volume: “Legendary Locals of New Haven.”

Posted at 06:56 AM | Permalink | Comments

Women's Work in World War II; Torrington Talk and Exhibit

02/11/14

Women's Work in World War II; Torrington Talk and Exhibit

Although no one today gives a second thought to women in the work place, it always hasn't been like that. Prior to World War II, the concept was novel, and even frowned upon in some cases.   "Women who were married were expected to stay at home—it was a common social belief," says John Cilio, author of Women's Work in World War II, who will be discussing that topic on February 27 at the Torrington Public Library at 6:30 p.m. "It was also a common social belief that women couldn't work long hours, and that they couldn't keep secrets." World War II changed all that. As men were drafted to fight in the war, it left a serious labor shortage on the home front. In order to keep the factories churning and businesses afloat—as...

Posted at 08:37 AM | Permalink | Comments

Slavery in Connecticut: Reminisces of Old "Ti"

02/03/14

Slavery in Connecticut: Reminisces of Old "Ti"

With the interest generated by 12 Years A Slave and in honor of Black History Month, we delved into the archives and found an interesting article in the 1905 edition of The Connecticut Magazine. Entitled "Reminisces of Old Negro Slavery Days," it was written by Judge Martin H. Smith of Suffield and chronicles some of the story of Old "Ti," a Connecticut slave during the era just after the American Revolution. From what can be gathered, Judge Martin was in his later years at the time of the writing; when he was younger, he had regular contact with the older Titus. What follows are excerpts from the original story that focus directly on Titus' life—Judge Smith's original piece contained a number of rambling passages that delved into other...

Posted at 06:57 AM | Permalink | Comments

New Book on Bridgeport's Gen. Tom Thumb Sheds Light on Celebrity in the 19th Century

01/24/14

New Book on Bridgeport's Gen. Tom Thumb Sheds Light on Celebrity in the 19th Century

Now that Bridgeport's historic Barnum Museum is being "re-envisioned," Eric Lehman's comprehensive biography of the city's most famous celebrity seems particularly timely.

Posted at 01:02 PM | Permalink | Comments

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