Alexander Hamilton Engraving.jpg

Engraving of Alexander Hamilton, from The Works of Alexander Hamilton, 1810.

Can’t get enough of Alexander Hamilton? Then head to the Connecticut Historical Society in Hartford for more on the colorful Founding Father.

The museum and library’s newest exhibit, Hamilton: His World, His Words, His Hair, is a slightly lighthearted look at the life and times of the real historical figure, featuring Revolutionary War-era clothing, artwork and objects. On display through Feb. 23, the exhibit features a set of dueling pistols similar to those used by Hamilton’s rival, Aaron Burr, a piece of the first American flag made by Betsy Ross, an engraving of the Boston Massacre by Paul Revere, a rare Loyalist red coat, a 1776 copy of Thomas Paine’s Common Sense, and, yes, a lock of Hamilton’s hair.

“We love how Broadway has embraced this important historical figure and made Hamilton the talk of the town,” says Jody Blankenship, chief executive of the Connecticut Historical Society. “It gives us a wonderful occasion to reach back into our Revolutionary War archives and bring some great pieces from that era out for everyone to view and enjoy once again. To reflect the tone of the musical, we have kept this exhibit on the lighter side and made this part of our history fun for all.”

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Dueling flintlock pistols, made by Samuel Brunn, England, 1795-1820, gift of Newton Brainard.

With a backdrop of quotes and photos from Hamilton, you’ll see more portraits, posters and objects relating to the real-life figures of the musical — historical letters written by Hamilton and George Washington, a necklace owned by Theodosia Burr, Aaron Burr’s daughter, and an original broadside of Washington’s farewell address, which Hamilton helped to write.

If you’re lucky enough to score tickets for Hamilton at The Bushnell, check out the historical society’s display of Hamilton-related items including a set of dueling pistols and a dress from the late 1700s.

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The Bloody Massacre perpetrated in King-Street Boston on March 5th 1770, engraved and printed by Paul Revere.

On Dec. 10 at 6 p.m., the historical society will host a free lecture, Alexander Hamilton and Fake News, about how the Founding Fathers viewed and dealt with a free press.

The Connecticut Historical Society is located at 1 Elizabeth St. in Hartford. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 seniors (65 and over), $8 students (with valid college ID) and youth (6-17).

860-236-5621, chs.org

Frank Rizzo has covered the arts-entertainment scene in Connecticut since disco reigned in the ’70s, including nearly 34 years writing for the Hartford Courant. Email him at FrRiz@aol.com. Follow him on Twitter @ShowRiz.

This article appeared in the December 2018 issue of Connecticut Magazine. Like what you read? You can subscribe here, or find the current issue on sale here.