As people become increasingly aware of the environmental impact of meat consumption, vegetarian and vegan options are becoming more common. With the global plant-based protein market projected to reach $5 billion this year, it’s little wonder that trend is making its way into weddings. “More and more people that are vegan and vegetarian are looking to make their wedding exclusively that,” says Chrissy Tracey, a plant-based chef and owner of Chrissy’s, a Connecticut-based vegetarian and vegan catering company. The chef shares some tips on making your plant-based wedding a success.

Remember that caterers cater to you

While there are many catering companies that specialize in vegan or vegetarian cuisine, Tracey says couples shouldn’t be afraid to reach out to a conventional caterer and see what meat- and dairy-free options they offer. “You’re able to talk with most catering companies in the state and tell them, ‘Hey, this is what I’m looking for,’ and they’ll work with you,” she says. But just as with any caterer, you’ll want to taste some food ahead of time to make sure it’s what you’re after on your special day.

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A buffet might be the way

Many vegans and vegetarians want the food for their wedding to be organic and sourced locally. “That can cause the price to really escalate,” Tracey says. “Don’t be afraid to do a buffet-style wedding because that can still be really nice and that can cut your cost tremendously.” This has the added effect of allowing your guests to choose from a variety of dishes. This is good at any wedding but particularly a vegetarian event where you might be exposing some of your guests to tastes and textures they’re not as familiar with.

Keep your meat-eating guests happy with lots of protein

Too often the vegetarian option at weddings is a collection of vegetables with little protein, Tracey says. This isn’t good even for vegetarian side dishes but can spell disaster if your wedding is meatless. She says that you’ll want to get your caterer to offer a menu that “really finds a way to veganize the things that meat eaters love. I make chickpea cutlets which are kind of like a traditional chicken cutlet and that way you can make things like chicken piccata and chicken parmesan and it still keeps it fun and exciting.”

The senior writer at Connecticut Magazine, Erik is the co-author of Penguin Random House’s “The Good Vices” and author of “Buzzed” and “Gillette Castle.” He is also an adjunct professor at WCSU’s MFA Program and Quinnipiac University